Let's Talk Kick Counts

By: Gloria Miles

 The author's daughter, in utero. 

The author's daughter, in utero. 

A fetus has sleeping and waking cycles.  One of the most exciting parts of pregnancy (for most), is feeling those little tiny movements and kicks.  They are very reassuring for the expectant mother and elicit a range of emotions for both those expecting and those allowed to feel the movements.  

I know that for my husband and children, it's a bit of bonding that occurs before the birth.  My sons love to hold their hand on my growing abdomen and feel the little rolls, elbows, and kicks. "I felt the baby!" they'll squeal. And, for myself, I'm always reassured to feel this little life growing and moving about. 

Okay, so what are kick counts? 

Kick counts are sort of what they sound like: counting baby's kicks.  Though, of course, it's not exclusive to kicks. Rolls, stretches, punches, and any type of movement counts as a "kick." 

I'm not feeling movement yet. When do I start? 

For most people, movement is felt starting between 18 to 26 weeks.  It really depends what number pregnancy it is, the lie of the baby, and where the placenta is located.  If the placenta is anterior (meaning against the uterine wall that is against the abdomen), movement may not be felt until later in pregnancy and with less frequency.  

Most providers advise to begin kick counts around 28 weeks.  However, ask yours for specific timelines and guidelines. 

How are the kicks counted? 

Choose a time a day that you know baby is most active.  Lie down on your left side and start counting movements.  You're hoping to feel ten movements within two hours.  Most likely, you'll feel that long before the two hour mark.  

Keep a journal or log.  You can write it down on a paper, use an app, or simply mark it on the calendar.  This also helps you see a pattern in fetal movement.

I didn't get ten kicks/I don't feel movement/I feel decreased movement.

First, don't panic.  Try eating a snack or drinking juice (though, ask for advice from your provider if your diet has restrictions in place) and try again. 

If you still do not get ten movements within two hours, if you think there's a significant decrease in movement, or if you have any concerns regarding fetal movement, call your provider for advice.  

 

Chime in! Did you or are you counting kick counts?  Did your provider recommend this practice?  How did you fit it into your routine? 

Note: This blog post is purely informational and not meant to be a substitute for medical advice or attention.  Please direct any questions or concerns to your own medical provider.  Whenever there is a question about fetal movement, a licensed health care professional should be consulted.  

Gloria Miles is a Navy veteran and mother of 3, soon-to-be 4. She wears many hats as a doula, Certified Aromatherapist, and student. She is currently working towards obtaining a Bachelor's in Healthcare Management, with an end goal of becoming a Certified Nurse-Midwife. When she is not blogging or hanging out with her family, she enjoys reading, knitting, hiking, and mud runs.